Mabu Thermas & Resort
Foz do Iguaçu, PR - Brazil

September 18 - 23, 2016

SUSTAINABLE CITRICULTURE:
the role of applied knowledge

Parallel Seminars

Texas A&M University – USA

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Short Bio

Dr. Bhimu Patil is the Professor and Director of the Vegetable and Fruit Improvement Center. The Center is part of AgriLife Research and Extension of Texas A&M University. He received B.S. and M.S degrees from University of Agricultural Sciences, Bangalore and Dharwad respectively and his Ph.D. degree from the Texas A&M University. His research on isolation and characterization of human health promoting compounds led to several new components and provided understanding of their biological activities reducing risk from several types of cancers, heart diseases and improve bone density. Additionally, his research is focused on pre and postharvest effects on human health promoting compounds in fruits and vegetables. He has published more than 170 scientific papers in peer-reviewed journals. He has edited several reviewed proceedings, book chapters, and a book. Dr. Patil served as an International Advisory Board Member in nine professional societies. He has been actively involved in both research and educational activities related to global level ‘Foods for Health’. He also served as chair of the Division of Agriculture and Food Chemistry of the American Chemical Society, currently, he is the chairman of the Medicinal and Aromatic Plants section of the International Society for Horticultural Sciences. He received 17 national and international awards.

He has been interviewed and/or his work has been published in 135 articles and news media including the Associated Press, Reuters, the Wall Street Journal, Fox Health Channel, and CNN. He gave more than 120 keynote, plenary and invited presentations in land grant institutions, professional societies, industry, and learned society organizations from several countries- China, Australia, New Zealand, South Korea, Brazil, Sweden, France, India, Israel, Spain, Canada, Portugal, and different states in the USA.

Summary of lecture

Beyond nutritional value: citrus fruits have diverse, complex health-promoting properties

Bhimanagouda S. Patil, Jayaprakasha, G.K and Murthy, K.N.C.
Vegetable and Fruit Improvement Center, Department of Horticultural Sciences
Texas A&M University, 1500 Research Parkway, A120, College Station, TX 77845-2119

Citrus fruits have strong, increasing popularity in the U.S. and many other countries for use as fresh fruit, juice, and even in cosmetics. Their high nutritional value and health-promoting properties have enhanced the popularity of citrus as consumer demand for “superfoods” has increased. We have known for centuries that citrus fruits are rich in vitamin C and work in the late 90’s explored the diverse chemical composition and health benefits of citrus consumption. This work identified and characterized more than 300 molecules from the edible and non-edible parts of different types of citrus fruit; these molecules include terpenoids (limonoids), flavonoids, pigments, carotenoids, phenolic acids, sugars, coumarins, amines, and sterols. Several of these compounds have shown significant health-promoting benefits in cardio-protection (antioxidant, hypolipidemic, prevention of stroke and cerebral infarction, anti-hypertensive effect) and inhibition of cancer, in vitro, in vivo, and in human clinical studies. Our research has shown that extracts of different citrus fruits and purified bioactive molecules can inhibit different organ-specific cancer cells. We have used advanced analytical tools to separate, purify, and characterize over 50 health-promoting compounds from different citrus fruits. Furthermore, we have used animal cell models to examine the mechanisms of reduced risk from certain types of cancer, cardioprotective activity, and the potential for reducing osteoporosis using specific citrus extracts and purified molecules. Additionally, citrus bioactives have also demonstrated the ability to reduce the risk from psychiatric disorders (such as dementia) and urinary disease (through citric acid). Here, we will discuss the major gaps in exploring and promoting citrus fruits for their potential health benefits. This study was supported by United States Department of Agriculture grant Designing Foods for Health through the Vegetable & Fruit Improvement Center 2010-34402-20875 and State funding 2013-121277 VFIC-TX state appropriation.

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